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. >> richard ruth was interviewed about his book "in buddha's company" at the u.s. naval academy. this is part of book tv's college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> host: book tvs on location at the u.s. naval academy in a aanapolis. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> guest: i teach southeast asian history. i concentrate on tie lan and vietnam. >> host: why is it important for students to know southeast asian history. >> guest: united states is still very much engaged in that corner of the worldment we have many alis and partners we're working with, and many students, midshipman, are going to be officers who are going to go to southeast asia and represent our interests there. so i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the culture and have some knowledge of their history. >> host: well, professor ruth. one of our long-time allies is thigh taken, and you have written a book called "in buddha's company: thai sole soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thailand was a close ally of the united states during the
of their force projection in the persian gulf into that conflict. i think there is hope that the u.s.-israel relationship is strong and open enough and the lines of communication are open up that it would not happen. one of the other things that if it may give a little positivity towards that is a concern that the nuclear facilities are so far in the ground that israel does not producing a satisfactory assault. they would need u.s. plant emissions to carry some of those weapons. perhaps that might give some hope there would be communication, if there is an attack down the line, that the two countries would be to work together and cordray. host: 3 more, go to foreignpolicy.com. thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you for having me. host: that does it for today. we will be back live tomorrow morning but lawmakers make their way back for the lame-duck session that begins today. we will be up there taking your calls and your comments and questions. thank you for watching today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satel
>>> dememracy in america. voters in the u.s. decide who they think should lead the country. one man has spent the past four years reshaping how americans see their country and how america is seen around the world. u.s. president barack obama took the wheel of an economy that resisted efforts to write it. now voters are deciding whether to stick with him or whether his republican opponent mitt romney deserves the job. eyewitness news line will focus all day on the race for president. >>> millions of americans are still voting. millions are already making their choices and already we're getting some hints about who they chose. our partners at abc news project barack obama will capture 3 electoral votes and mitt romney 33. >>> let's take a look at the projections state by state. the states in blue are for obama. the runs in red for romney. romney in south carolina, indiana, and kentucky. the projections give obama 3 electoral votes and they hope the number adds up to 270 or more needed to win the election. obama and the first lady arrived at home in chicago. the president wrapped hip h
government which still considers the plant a dangerous drug? as the most expensive election in u.s. history comes to a close, we will talk about the issue facing more and more americans that rarely got a mention in the presidential campaign -- poverty. >> the problem is, obama himself no better than romney is still very much part of a system that has failed poor and working people. capitalism is not working for poor and working people in america. we have to bear witness to that. >> we will speak what dr. cornel west and pbs host tavis smiley. together they have written, "the rich and the rest of us: a poverty manifesto." all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road in chicago. the pentagon has confirmed that iran fired at a pilotless u.s. drone last week, but missed its target. pentagon spokesperson george little insisted the incident occurred in international, not iranian, airspace, and vowed that u.s. surveillance flights will continue. >> the incident occurred over international waters approximate
performed by national captioning institute] >> the u.s. house gavels in to begin their first bit of legislative work starting the lame duck session, four bills including on asthma inhalers and gavel back out when they finish to return for votes at 6:30 and we expect them to swear in a number of members filling out the remainder of terms for the 112th congress. we expect those to happen during the upcoming votes at 6:30 this evening. the senate also in session today and they have been dealing with a bill drk working on rules to federal land to federal hunting and fishing and the house and senate committees getting under way this week. the intelligence committees in particular off the floor, the intelligence committee of the senate and the house will be meeting in closed session to look at the attack in libya in benghazi this week. tomorrow on c-span 3, we will be covering a hearing looking at the meningitis outbreak. that is tomorrow morning at 10:00 eastern, c-span 3. the president will be hosting a news conference. we do not know the time of the news conference yet. this will be
about taxes, u.s. economic policy. but that was about taxes and the electoral campaign. now we had elections and the taxes are at the center of a very important political debate and at the center of negotiations between the obama administration and congress, particularly the republican controlled house. as i watched the president during his recent press conference and listened to leaders of the house, i think everybody agrees it would be highly desirable to reach a compromise. they also agree the elections provided a mandate. the president seems to think that he is the one who got the mandate and that republicans are saying, well, yes, mr. president, but me, too. and how do you reconcile two mandates and reach an agreement? what are the consequences of failing to do so? this is one of the most important issues facing the administration, the congress, and the nation. mr. norquist. >> several months ago i said there are two options for after the election. after the election, if romney was elected, he would have republican senate to go along with the house. they would pass the ryan pl
in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other
. i will tell you here and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. >> we called it a calling. >> a calling, exactly. >> exactly. word of honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the affect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is
, and if we don't tackle these threats, the u.s. and other nations will pay the price in the form of lost economic growth and development, stifled innovation and social progress and diminished opportunity. so i will describe those threats and talk about what needs to happen for us to keep the global internet on the right path. to harness the opportunities new communications, technologies to benefit all. there's a lot that about the relationship between communications technologies and world events, but in some important ways the relationship between the mutations, technology and world history has always been a profound one. the printing press was a new communications technology that changed the world. it won't take us back that far, but for a few minutes i will take us back 50 years to a powerfully important speech given by an fcc chairman in 1961. that made president john f. kennedy's. , newton minnow, spoke to the national association of broadcasting. his speech generally remembered for the declaration that tv had become a vast wasteland. but the speech, and i recommend reading it was ac
. the u.s. is taking a lot of steps right now to right the ship. labor may be one of them. taxation may be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this is obviously a very critical role for the administration and for the american people as a whole. with t
and outline the next steps i will take. as background, puerto rico has been a u.s. territory since 1898. the island is home to 3.7 million american citizens who cannot vote for president, are not represented in the senate, and elect a nonvoting member to the house. federal law is supreme in puerto rico but its residents are treated unequally under many federal programs. voters were first asked whether they want puerto rico to remain a territory. over 1.7 million people answered. which is about 75% of registered voters on the island. 54% said they did not want the current status to continue while 46% said they did. voters were then asked to express their preference among the three viable alternatives to the current status. statehood, free association and independence. over 1.3 million people chose an option. 61% voted for statehood. 33% voted for free association. and 5.5% voted for independence. in addition, 472,000 voters did not provide an answer. this marked the first time voters were directly asked whether they want puerto rico to remain a territory. one of the two main political pa
will not changey law or compromise u.s. sovereignty. it will not lead to any new lawsuits because its terms do not create any new rights and it cannot be enforced in any united states court. for families that choose to educate their children at home, the treaty will not change any of the current rights and obligations under american law. i was pleased that in -- leading pro-life groups like the national write to life committee confirm that the treaty does not promote, expand access, or create any right to an abortion. when we tried to move in treaty earlier this year, some objected on the basis that the senate really shouldn't ratify a treaty during a lame-duck session. well, we did a little study. i want to moat for the record that since 1970 in the last 42 year, the senate has ratified at least 19 treaties during lame-duck sessions. there's no procedural justification for not ratifying this treaty that could mean so much to those living with disabilities. thanks to decades of bipartisan cooperation, our country embodies the worldwide gold standard for those living with disabilities. in closi
of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader before assuming leadership of the library of congress 25 years ago. as chair of the library of congress caucus, it's been a great pleasure to work with dr. billington and his outstanding staff on a variety of issues and activities for members of congress. the caucus urges you to join speaker boehner today in the rayburn room at 11:00 a.m. as he honors dr. james billington and his exemplary quarter century of l
appointments, an inclination for restraint. i want to appoint judges who understand as a u.s. supreme court explained, that law is something more than the mere -- law is something more than mere will exerted as an act of power. if you think about being governor of a state like florida, your biggest legacy is probably your judges. we appointed about just over 80 judges now so far in 22 months, and so these are the individuals that are beginning to help -- decide whether we have three branches of government. i just remember civics, class, three branches of government, and i made sure everybody always remembers that in my state. the election is over. we may not be happy with the current occupant of the white house, but the question is what are we going to do about it? will you take action or stay on the sidelines? will you join the fight for conservative solutions with states like florida where we are fighting for families by creating jobs, quality education, and keeping the cost of living low? the time for arguing over who caused the problems has ended. now it is the time to break from the ca
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
no longer hailed as a hero? >>> good morning, everyone, as we come on the air, more breaking news. the u.s. on high alert right now over a possible war escalating in the middle east. overnight, three israelis killed by rockets from the gaza strip. israeli warplanes are hitting dozens of sites in the gaza. all of that follows a dramatic assassination. this is still escalating at this hour. you see the assassination right there. this could be dangerous. >>> another story we're following closer to home, how did a woman steal $50 million to fuel her passion for racehorses? and how did she finally get caught? we'll explain it all. >>> and it was a routine cheerleading stunt gone horribly wrong at an nba game. now, new details on -- >> no, no, no. >> -- a cheerleader's condition. >> oh! >> and people are asking now, is this sport just too dangerous? >> lots of injuries. >>> but first, let's get right to the cia sex scandal and the breaking news overnight about the veteran fbi agent who took the first investigative steps that could lead to the downfall of cia director david petraeus. brian ross h
ayotte. she went to address concerns they have over statements the ambassador made over the u.s. mission in benghazi on september 11th that left ambassador chris stevens and three other americans dead. i want you to listen to what senator graham, republican south carolina, here, said immediately after the meeting ended. >> bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explanation about how four americans died in benghazi, libya, by ambassador rice, i think does not do justice to the reality at the time, and in hindsight clearly was completely wrong. but here's the key. in real time, it was a statement disconnected from reality. >> and now here is senator ayotte. >> i want to say that i'm more troubled today, knowing -- having met with the acting director of the cia and ambassador rice, because it's certainly clear from the beginning that we knew that those with ties to al qaeda were involved in the attack on the embassy. and clearly the impression that was given, the information given to the american people, was wrong. in fact, ambassador rice said today, ab
to explain the misleading information given out in the days after the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans including the u.s. ambassador to libya died in what we now know was a terrorist attack. but that isn't what the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice said when she went on national television five days after the attack. today rice is up on capitol hill. she's explaining what happened and some big-name republicans clearly are not very happy with her answers. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following what's become a pretty long day -- a tiring day for the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. what's the latest, dana? >> reporter: wolf, the three republican senators who had vowed to block susan rice from being secretary of state if the president nominates her had really softened the rhetoric in recent days. i'm told the reason for that was because it was a curtesy in order for them to wait until they had a face-to-face meeting with her which was today. after that meeting their criticism was harsher than ever. the way thes
will derail the biggest economic driver in the u.s. and that is biotech. mike milken talking about life-saving drugs, jobs that come with them and our status as the leader of the industry, all at stake if we go over the fiscal cliff. and dr. francis collins with the national institutes of health. fiscal cliff. folks including today to liz hy malcolmed the month of november and the red and nasdaq and s&p close slightly higher, consumer discretionary and industrials were this month's top performing sectors, utilities and energy lagged behind. oil posting its second straight day of gains closing the trading day up 1%, $80.91 for a barrel of oil and today's gains in crude up 3% for the month of november as concern over threats to supply due to mideast violence offset ongoing demand worries and personal spending, are you part of this, it sold for the first time in five months dropping 0.2%. the commerce department is a debating that to hurricanes and the lowering wages and salaries by an annual rate of $18.2 billion. dave: we may get a dividend bust in the month of december and discuss all o
, a longtime u.s. diplomat and mideast envoy, serving in the george h.w. bush, clinton, and obama administrations. he's now a counselor at the washington institute for near east policy. and khaled elgindy, a palestinian participant in the 2007 annapolis peace negotiations, and now a fellow at the saban center for middle east policy at the brookings institution. i want to start with you. your reading on where things stand tonight in termed of a pause or cease-fire. >> i do think the outlines of the cease-fire have probably been shapedded at this point. i think the secretary of state is there and has a chance to finalize this by, in a sense, becoming the, i think, the repository of the commitments that each side has made. i think one of the things that's going on right now is trying to make certain that all the understandings are understood the same way by each side and whatever promises are being made will now be promises made to her as well. in effect she becomes almost the holder of those as a kind of deposit. that, i think, is a chance for the cease-fire to actually be implement
with the justice department, bp would admit to criminal misconduct and pay what could be the largest penalty in u.s. history, in the billions of dollars. in exchange, the company would be exempt from prosecution. >>> and the end of twinkies could be just hours away. now, everybody, hugs after the show. maker of the snack cakes, as well as wonder bread, as given its striking workers an ultimatum. return to work by 5:00 p.m. today or it will start liquidating the company in bankruptcy court. some 18,000 jobs and the happiness of millions is at stake. >>> finally, a boys' football team in oklahoma just turned the field into a field of dreams for their coach's son. 9-year-old jason smith jr., football fanatic. but he's in a wheelchair because of muscular dystrophy. so, a referee came up with an idea. the other team said okay. put a helmet on jason and push him down the field. >> that's great. >> into the end zone. so, he could score his very first touchdown. thankfully dad, as you can see, rolling somewhat excited on the entire time with his cell phone. congratulations to you, jason. touchdown. >> good
to train. specialist nelson is just one of 60 -- 60 u.s. service members who have been killed this year by the afghans that they were sent to train. i don't know where the outrage is by the united states congress. i am very disappointed in both parties, their leadership to allow our young men and women to stay in a war that has no end to it, makes no sense to the american people. in fact, mr. speaker, the american people have said time after time, poll after poll that they want to bring our troops home now, not 2014 but now. on october 7, there was a national article written and the title was "a mother mourns a grim milestone," referring to the 2,000 american casualties from the afghan war. lisa freeman, who was interviewed in the article, who lost her son, captain matthew freeman, in 2009, he was shot by a sniper in afghanistan, ms. freeman said, i just sat here reliving the pain and wondering , where is america's outrage? where is america's concern that we're still at war? and mr. speaker, i made reference to this yesterday. the october 14 "new york times" editorial, and the title, "t
packaged foods sold in the u.s., and at 70 $billion, we're talking big business. conagra is known for name brands like pam, slim jim, and reddi whip, and it also makes some private label goods. ralcorp is the top manufacturer of growing store brand categories such as cereal and pasta, and it supplies companies like walmart and mcdonald's. together, conagra and ralcorp could become a private label powerhouse. and they might actually make store brand food that's good to eat. >> with this acquisition, what conagra can do that perhaps ralcorp couldn't is they can bring their expertise on the branded side on innovation and r&d, and elevate even more the quality of their products from where they are today. >> reporter: that means more americans are likely to find private label foods more palatable. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> susie: that big conagra deal didn't get much attention on wall street today. investors were more concerned about the debt problems in europe and the fiscal cliff crisis here in the u.s. stocks fell late today after senate majority leader harry reid said lawmakers are m
lost more than 40% of their wealth from 2007 to 2010. nearly one in six u.s. residents is officially poor, the highest rate in 50 years. 22% of american children live in poverty. we're facing an economic situation that resembles the years leading up to the great depression. now, this prevailing budget plan calls for deep cuts, environmental protection, social security, medicare, medicaid. well, corporations and the top 1% get tax cuts of nearly $3 trillion over the next decade. this is not how you protect a democracy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. poe: mr. speaker, the -- a president has finally given us his balanced plan to allegedly avoid the fiscal cliff. he wants to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion. he wants another stimulus package of $50 billion. he wants the authority to raise the debt ceiling without asking congress for approval. say it isn't so, mr. speaker.
will continue to watch that story for u.s. well. part of the mix to avoid the fiscal cliff is these jobless benefits. that is the headline in the politics and policy section of "the washington post." "over 2 million americans could lose their jobless benefits before the end of the year." host: susan, michigan, what do you think? should we cut medicare and social security? caller: absolutely not. absolutely not. host: why not? caller: i am a woman who has finally reached the age of social security. all the years the work, this money was taken out of my paycheck. i was told from a very young age that when i reached a fine age of the period where you retire and you can get social security, that all the money that i paid in would be refunded to me. this money is not to be touched, not to be changed. for my generation, or the generations that are coming after i am gone, to mess with social security is absolutely a travesty. it should never, ever retouched. host: president obama, meeting with labor leaders today, as well as other liberal groups, and also planning to meet with business leaders. he
that we're going. as the largest fuel consumer in the world today and by far the largest in the u.s. government, as i said, 93%, the department of defense has a special role to play, and moreover, because of our dependence on foreign sources of energy we continually send our men and women in uniform in harm's way to maintain that access to oil. the second criticism we often hear is that biofuels are too expensive. now, it is true that advanced biofuels are not yet in full production and so they can't compete with oil, since the oil market is a hundred years old, but d.o.d. investment has caused the price to drop dramatically over the last two years, and biofuels are more immune from price shots than -- than oil. there are also significant costs to traditional foreign sources of energy that are not shown at the gas pump. those costs are associated with protecting our shipping lanes and oil supplies and for over 60 years we've been trolling the -- patrolling the persian gulf, these costs for oil remain underappreciated. for our military the issue of energy security investment in biofu
. >>> and all that matters. >> u.s. troops serving our country are being served thanksgiving dinner. >> thousands of miles away on "cbs this morning." >> from kabul, afghanistan -- happy thanksgiving! captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning" on this thanksgiving day. happy thanksgiving. norah o'donnell is off. we are waking up to good news out of the middle east. for the first time in more than a week the cease fire between israel and hamas held overnight and continues to hold at this hour. >> people in gaza and southern israel are leaving shelters and returning home after that week of air attacks across the border. hamas and its supporters inside gaza are claiming victory. charlie d'agata is in gaza city this morning. >> reporter: it's like being on a different planet in gaza city whole world away from what this place was like 24 hours ago. people are smiling, congratulating one another. we had to fight through traffic for the first time. and for the first time people here got a good night's sleep and woke up without the worry of israeli
>> tonight, anthony kennedy talks about preserving the u.s. constitution followed by the history of the presidential appointment process. anthony kennedy talks about protecting and preserving the u.s. constitution. from the heritage foundation, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it is great for me to be able to join john in welcoming new year to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture. the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity, and civil society flourished. to help achieve this vision, the center launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and -- inform citizens on topics related to this constitution. the series promotes the protection of individual liberties, property rights, free enterprise, constitutional limits on government. we've been able to feature some of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight'
, they are eerily similar. here's why. back in september, prudence bushnell, the former u.s. ambassador to kenya at the time of the '98 bombings penned an op-ed in the "new york times" in reaction to the benghazi attack. she wrote, "we must make that work safer. the reasons change, but the human effects are the same. for two years before we were blown up in nairobi, kenya, my team and i thought, nagged was the word the state department colleagues used to have security threats and vulnerablallities assessed. i was told there was no more money for a more secure embassy. just to make sure everyone is following this. let's recap this. back in the late '90s, those in the kenyan embassy were begging the state department for additional security before the bombings, but not given additional resources. does this sound familiar? it gets worse. after the attacks in '98, susan rice was put out by the administration at the time to go on pbs and talk about the attack. we have the tape. watch what she says very closely. >> all of our embassies around the world have received warning of this, notice of this, and
the unusual step of receiving praise from all sides from u.s. officials from hamas, even from some israeli officials for his pragmatism but certainly that imagine that tism in its own rule here could be put to the test almost immediately. with new decrees expanding his power, making him not subject to the courts and still a real question how that will sit with the egyptian people. gregg, back to you. >> steve harrigan in cairo, egypt. steve, thanks. jesse jackson jr. out of congress now but not out of the woods by any means. the democrat from illinois submitting his resignation yesterday just two weeks after voters reelected him for his ninth full term. now it came after he had been absent for many months citing inpatient treatment for bipolar disorder but on top of his health battle, the former congressman is also facing a federal investigation among other things accused of misusing campaign funds to fix up his home. now jackson could face the fallout from that probe. even though he is no longer holding public office. peter doocy has the latest from d.c. >> some folks in illinois are now
, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american protest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of the contentious presidential election campaign by agreeing to go on the sunday shows to present the administration's position. >> sreenivasan: collins stopped short of joining other republican senators who have said they will oppose rice if she is nominated to be secretary of state. later, president obama again defended rice. he called her extraordinary, and cabinet members joined him in applause. a pair of suicide car bombers in syria blew themselves up today in a suburb of damascus. at least 34 people were killed. the twin explosions shattered buildings and left streets littered with rubble. in addition to the dead, the stat
forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of which has not been very much observed. i think we have ideas for iran. that will give really intrusive inspections. it will give the right for the international community to go where there is concern. not where iran is declaring. but then to pay for that is to lift the sanctions. and then we can have an outcome. and let the iranian people take care of it. it's not for the outside to do the regime change. >> thank you. we'll ta
, and commitment each of them so courageously demonstrated. i am pleased that the u.s. house of representatives is acting to pass this legislation to name the u.s. office in cocoa in honor of harry t. and harriette moore. passage of house resolution 2338 will further honor the achievements and sacrifices of the moores. leaders and first martyrs of our nation's modern civil rights era. designating the united states post office at 600 florida avenue in cocoa as the harry t. and harriette moore post office will demonstrate their legacy in a town where mr. moore began his service to others. this will serve as a constant reminder to our community of the important and lasting contributions the moores made to cocoa and the nation. i urge my colleagues to join me in passing this legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes mr. clay. mr. clay: mr. speaker, let me thank and congratulate my good friend from florida, there posey, for bringing-mr. posey, for bringing to this house, bringing to our attention these two great americans and legacy they left this country. and thank yo
. >>> tear gas in cairo near the u.s. embassy as the fight for democracy goes on. >> face to face. susan rice and john mccain, the man who wanted watergate style hearings, meet. and only cnn catches up with mccain before the big meeting. >> what do you have to learn today from miss rice? >> whatever ambassador rice wants to tell me. she's the one who asked for the meeting. i didn't. >> wouldn't you like to be a fly on the wall? >>> spyfall, real-life bond movie. yasser arafat's body was exhumed. was the palestinian leader po h poisoned by israeli spies? >>> plus this. >> you said walden is in trouble. >> i'm the trouble walden has been in, repeatedly. >> he calls it filth, the half in "two and a half men" begs you not to watch his show. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin with a high stakes meeting just minutes from now. this hour, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations will muster all of her diplomatic skills and tiptoe through a political mine field. susan rice meets with republican senator john mccain. as you
in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same problem that the stem bill in september had. it holds visa from a legal immigration program that works over to a new visa category where there may or may not be sufficient demand to use those visas each year. immigration
for the use of military force may be construed to authorize the detention of u.s. citizens or lawful resident aliens who are captured inside the united states unless -- and this is a big "unless" -- an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. as i read the amendment, it says that the military detention of u.s. citizens may be authorized in accordance with the law of war as long as this action is expressly authorized by congress. further, the amendment's requirement for express authorization applies only to the detention of u.s. citizens who are captured inside the united states, so no such authorization would be required for detention of a u.s. citizen in the course of military operations overseas. i believe it is appropriate that congress focus on the issue of military detention at the time that they authorize the use of military force. as would be required by the feinstein amendment. as the supreme court has stated, detention is a fundamental and accepted incident to armed conflict. without such authority, our armed services could be put in the untenable position of being able t
americans. i'm proud of the meaningful work we have achieved with our dam and levees, u.s. port security, chemical facility security, cybersecurity, criminal justice reform, immigration reform, national security, human trafficking, bringing in government spending and other issues that came before the congress. we wish to thank the volunteers and supporters who were buy our side and your support is gratifying and humbling and we are immensely grateful, god bless you and god bless this land of ours. i read that to suggest the feelings that i have at this time when i am approaching the end of my service in this house. and one of the thoughts i have as i do that is the question of civility in this house, in the congress, in the political dialogue and the country at large. if one examines the history of the house of representatives, one understands immediately that we are governed not by roberts rules of order but by jefferson's manual, the manual authored by thomas jefferson. and if you analyze the spirit and the letter of that manual, you will find that president jefferson believed that vig
to have the greatest influence obviously on israel, because the u.s. does not deal directly with hamas, but essentially she'll be joining a chorus of regional leaders in trying to apply intense diplomatic pressure to get both sides to step back from the brink before it's too late. >> reporter: khalid is the group's political leader, i know you had a chance to talk to him directly yesterday. you asked him does hamas want pease with -- peace with israel? what did he say? >> reporter: well, he didn't really answer the question directly. he began by giving a message to the american people, that the american people need to wake up and stop supporting israel and stand instead in support of 350 million arabs. and then he said that essentially he sees the palestinians as the victims in this situation and the israelis as the aggressors. so in his mind, it is up to the israelis to sort of reach out to make the first step towards putting down their weapons and establishing some kind of a pac -- peace. >> clarissa, thank you so much for the update. >>> meanwhile, four men in california have been a
>>> and susan rice is speaking out and defending herself after those statements she had after the u.s. consulate attack in benghazi. >>> plus, a turkey day tradition. the macy's day parade stepping off in a matter two of hours from now in new york. we're live on the streets amid all the holiday thanksgiving. >> it's november 22nd, thanksgiving day. a special edition of "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. happy thanksgiving. our "starting point," the cease-fire in israel and gaza is holding. in gaza city, where so much blood spilled over the last eight days, palestinians are celebrating in the streets. israel and hamas agreeing to halt all acts of aggression against each other. >> this cease-fire deal brokered largely over the phone. president obama and the president of egypt, mohamed morsi, apparently making a real connection to stop the carnage. i want to begin our coverage here of the very fragile truce with arwa damon live with us this morning in gaza city. arwa, i think i hear horns honking. is the celebration there continuing where you are? >> reporter
to the center of the country. it's set to hit rome and city officials are on alert. the u-s is set to be the top oil producer by 20-20 a new forecast by the international energy agency says the united states will overtake saudi arabia to become the number one producer of oil. the u-s increased crude oil production by 14 percent from 2008 to 2011. the u-s currently imports twenty percent of its energy needs. the report also says the u-s will be completely energy independant in 10 years. judy garland's iconic blue and white dress from the 19-39 classic film the wizard of oz, has sold for 480-thousand dollars at auction. in beverly hills. the dress was the highest priced item during the two-day auction. also sold a steve mcqueen racing jacket for 50 thousand dollars, julie andrews' sound of music dress sold for 38- thousand. a piece of prince william and kate middleton's wedding cake went for 75-hundred dollars. just ahead when the new blackberry is set to be released. and, still to come this midday: if you're torn about when to fly home for the holidays. we'll tell you if thanksgiving or christm
on the deadly attack on the u-s consulate in benghazi, libya. the assault killed u-s ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. lawmakers will question acting c-i-a director michael morell, national intelligence director james clapper, and a few other officials today. legislators are looking into: why intelligence leaders didn't anticipate or repel theand the obama administration's public response. >> what is clear is that this administration including the president himself had intentionally misinformed, in fact lied to the american people in the aftermath of this tragedy. some republicans are criticizing u.n. ambassador susan rice. after the attack, she said intelligence pointed to a spontaneous attack... not a pre- planned one. president obama said the g-o-p should go after him instead former cia director david petraeus denied that his scheduled testimony over the september attack in benghazi, libya, had anything to do with his resignation, he told hln's kyra phillips. petraeus said that he never shared classified information with paula having an affair with. defense secretary l
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